Li-Ion Battery Deep Cycle Lithium Ion Battery Pack 20ah 30ah 40ah 45ah 50ah 60ah 72v Lithium Battery

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Li-Ion Battery Deep Cycle Lithium Ion Battery Pack 20ah 30ah 40ah 45ah 50ah 60ah 72v Lithium Battery

Li-Ion Battery Deep Cycle Lithium Ion Battery Pack 20ah 30ah 40ah 45ah 50ah 60ah 72v Lithium Battery

Product Name lithium battery
Voltage 72V
Capacity 20ah 30ah 40ah 45ah 50ah 60ah or customized
Max discharge current 40A(Adjustable)
Charge mode Constant current/constant voltage
Charge voltage 84V
Charge current 4A/Adjustable
 BMS reliable protection Over charge protection

Over discharge protection

Over current protection

Short circuit protection

Temperature protection

Cell Balance

Can be customized

Operating environment Parallel (P) Charging, 0°C ~ 65°C , 65±20%RH;

Discharging, 0°C~65°C , 65±20%RH

Storage environment 0°C~65°C, 65±20%RH/Please keep charge battery every 2 month if you don’t use it
 Cycle Life  over 500 times 80%DOD
Warranty  1 year

Battery researchers agree that one of the most promising possibilities for future battery technology is the lithium-air (or lithium-oxygen) battery, which could provide three times as much power for a given weight as today’s leading technology, lithium-ion batteries. But tests of various approaches to creating such batteries have produced conflicting and confusing results, as well as controversies over how to explain them.

Now, a team at MIT has carried out detailed tests that seem to resolve the questions surrounding one promising material for such batteries: a compound called lithium iodide (LiI). The compound was seen as a possible solution to some of the lithium-air battery’s problems, including an inability to sustain many charging-discharging cycles, but conflicting findings had raised questions about the material’s usefulness for this task. The new study explains these discrepancies, and although it suggests that the material might not be suitable after all, the work provides guidance for efforts to overcome LiI’s drawbacks or find alternative materials.

The new results appear in the journal Energy and Environmental Science, in a paper by Yang Shao-Horn, MIT’s W.M. Keck Professor of Energy; Paula Hammond, the David H. Koch Professor in Engineering and head of the Department of Chemical Engineering; Michal Tulodziecki, a recent MIT postdoc at the Research Laboratory of Electronics; Graham Leverick, an MIT graduate student; Yu Katayama, a visiting student; and three others.

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