Lifepo4 Battery 3.7V 20AH 30AH 32Ah 60AH Lithium Ion Battery Pack For Solar Storage

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Lifepo4 Battery 3.7V 20AH 30AH 32Ah 60AH Lithium Ion Battery Pack For Solar Storage

Lifepo4 Battery 3.7V 20AH 30AH 32Ah 60AH Lithium Ion Battery Pack For Solar Storage

Lifepo4 Battery 3.7V 20AH 30AH 32Ah 60AH Lithium Ion Battery Pack For Solar Storage

NO.

Item

Specifications

1

Nominal capacity

  32Ah

0.2C Discharge

2

Initial Impedance

≤30mΩ

3

Weight

Approx:18kg

4 Nominal voltage

Fully charge voltage(FC)

Fully discharge voltage(FD)

3.7 V

53V Defined in this DOC: FC = 73 V

73 V Defined in this DOC: FD =44 V

5   Standard charge current 0.2C
6   Shipment voltage V
7   Standard charging method

0.5C CC(constant current)charge to FC, then CV(constant voltage FC)charge till charge current decline to ≤0.01C

8   Charging time  Standard Charging

Approx 3 hours

9

Standard Discharge Current

Constant current 0.2 C  end voltage FD

10 Max. charge current 0℃~15℃ 0.5C
15℃~25℃ 0.5C
25℃~45℃ 0.5C
11 Max. discharge current -10℃~15℃ 0.5C
15℃~60℃ 0.5C
12  Charge cut-off voltage   Refer the spec
13  Discharge cut-off Voltage   Refer the spec
14 Storage temperature -20℃~60℃ ≤1 month Percentage of recoverable capacity no less than 80% of the initial capacities
-20℃~45℃ ≤3 month
-20℃~28℃ ≤1 year
 15

Recoverable capacity

Constant current 0.5C charge to FC, then constant voltage FC charge to current declines to 0.01C, rest for 10min,constant current 0.5C discharge to FD,rest for 10min.Repeat above steps 3 times, recording the maximum capacity
 16  Storage Humidity ≤75% RH
17  Appearance Without distortion and leakage
18

Standard testing condition

  Temperature               : 23±5℃

Humidity               :  ≤75%RH

Atmospheric Pressure: 86-106 Kpa

“It was interesting that Gallant and co-workers cleverly combined the prior knowledge from two different areas, metal-gas battery electrochemistry and carbon-dioxide capture chemistry, and succeeded in increasing both the energy density of the battery and the efficiency of the carbon-dioxide capture,” says Kisuk Kang, a professor at Seoul National University in South Korea, who was not associated with this research.

“Even though more precise understanding of the product formation from carbon dioxide may be needed in the future, this kind of interdisciplinary approach is very exciting and often offers unexpected results, as the authors elegantly demonstrated here,” Kang adds.

MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering provided support for the project.

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