Rechargeable Lifepo4 Prismatic Battery With High Capacity For Lithium Battery Solar Storage

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Rechargeable Lifepo4 Prismatic Battery With High Capacity For Lithium Battery Solar Storage

Rechargeable Lifepo4 Prismatic Battery With High Capacity For Lithium Battery Solar Storage

Rechargeable Lifepo4 Prismatic Battery With High Capacity For Lithium Battery Solar Storage

Color Blue(customizable)
Nominal voltage 3.2v
Chemistry IFR/LiFePo4
Capacity 240Ah
Max discharge current 400A
Contiuous discharge current 240A
Max charge voltage 3.6V±0.5V
Voltage at end of discharge 2.5V
Max charge current 1C-240A
Rechargeable Yes
Positive Flat
Charge temperature 0-45°C
Discharge temperature -20-60°C
Storage temperature 1 year -20-20°C;3 months -20-40°C;1 month -20-60°C

The researchers observed a good correlation between the lattice properties determined using the model and the lithium ion conductor material’s conductivity. “We did some experiments to support this idea experimentally” and found the results matched well, she says.

They found, in particular, that the vibrational frequency of lithium itself can be fine-tuned by tweaking its lattice structure, using chemical substitution or dopants to subtly change the structural arrangement of atoms.

The new concept can now provide a powerful tool for developing new, better-performing materials that could lead to dramatic improvements in the amount of power that could be stored in a battery of a given size or weight, as well as improved safety, the researchers say. Already, they used the method to find some promising candidates. And the techniques could also be adapted to analyze materials for other electrochemical processes such as solid-oxide fuel cells, membrane based desalination systems, or oxygen-generating reactions.

The team included Hao-Hsun Chang at MIT; Douglas Abernathy, Dipanshu Bansal, and Olivier Delaire at Oak Ridge; Santoshi Hori and Ryoji Kanno at Tokyo Institute of Technology; and Filippo Maglia, Saskia Lupart, and Peter Lamp at Research Battery Technology at BMW Group in Munich. The work was supported by BMW, the National Science Foundation, and the U.S. Department of Energy.

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