Lifepo4 Battery Cell Prismatic 3.2V 50AH Lithium Battery Hot Sale For EV/Storage

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Lifepo4 Battery Cell Prismatic 3.2V 50AH Lithium Battery Hot Sale For EV/Storage

Lifepo4 Battery Cell Prismatic 3.2V 50AH Lithium Battery Hot Sale For EV/Storage

Lifepo4 Battery Cell Prismatic 3.2V 50AH Lithium Battery Hot Sale For EV/Storage

No. Item unit Parameters Remark
1 Nominal Capacity Ah 50 Capacity according to standard

discharge, After standard charge

2 Nominal Voltage V 3.2 Average Voltage according to standard

discharge, After standard charge

3 Charge Type / CC/CV /
4 Charge Cut-off Voltage V 3.65 /
5 Discharge Cut-off Voltage V 2 /
6 Continuous  discharge current A 20 constant current
7 Max Discharge current A 50 10s
 8 Max charge current   A 50
9 Weight g 1.35Kg
10 Inner Resistance ≤8 /
11 Dimension(T×W×H) 36*115*166mm
12 Working

Temperature

Charging °C 0~45 /
Discharging °C -20~60 /
13 Storage

Temperature

1 month °C -20~60 /
3 months °C -20~45 /
6 months °C -20~25 /
Atmospheric pressure KPa 86~106 /
Relative Humidity RH 25%~85% /

The findings are reported today in the journal Science by former MIT graduate student Brandon J. Hopkins ’18, W.M. Keck Professor of Energy Yang Shao-Horn, and professor of mechanical engineering Douglas P. Hart.

While several other methods have been used to extend the shelf life of metal-air batteries (which can use other metals such as sodium, lithium, magnesium, zinc, or iron), these methods can sacrifice performance Hopkins says. Most of the other approaches involve replacing the electrolyte with a different, less corrosive chemical formulation, but these alternatives drastically reduce the battery power.

Other methods involve pumping the liquid electrolyte out during storage and back in before use. These methods still enable significant corrosion and can clog plumbing systems in the battery pack. Because aluminum is hydrophilic (water-attracting) even after electrolyte is drained out of the pack, the remaining electrolyte will cling to the aluminum electrode surfaces. “The batteries have complex structures, so there are many corners for electrolyte to get caught in,” which results in continued corrosion, Hopkins explains.

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