Lithium Battery 60V 20AH Li-Ion Lithium Battery For Electric Scooters

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Lithium Battery 60V 20AH Li-Ion Lithium Battery For Electric Scooters

Lithium Battery 60V 20AH Li-Ion Lithium Battery For Electric Scooters

Lithium Battery 60V 20AH Li-Ion Lithium Battery For Electric Scooters

Product Specifications 60V 120AH
Combination Method 17S10P (17 series 10) Battery Model 18650
Optional Capacity 1800mAh 2000mAh 2200mAh 2400mAh 2600mAh 3000mAh 3200mAh 3400mAh
Rated Voltage 60V Factory Charged 40%~60%
Rated Capacity 20000mAh Product Weight Customized
Rated Power 1224Wh Product Size Customized
Internal Resistance 200~300mΩ milliohm Charging Temperature 0-40°C
Charging Method CC&CV (constant current & pressure) Discharge Temperature -20-60°C
Charge Cut-off Voltage 71.4V Storage Temperature -20-40°C
Discharge Cut-off Voltage 51V Cycle Life 500 times
Standard Charge Current 0.2C Customized Yes
Fast Charge Current 0.5C Suitable Type Electric Bike
Maximum Charge Current 1C Product Certification MSDS CE FCC ROHS UN38.3
Standard Discharge Current 0.2C Battery Material Lithium Cobaltate
Fast Discharge Current 0.5C Rechargeable Yes
The Maximum Discharge Current 1.5C Charge and Discharge Port The same port

Researchers around the globe have been on a quest for batteries that pack a punch but are smaller and lighter than today’s versions, potentially enabling electric cars to travel further or portable electronics to run for longer without recharging. Now, researchers at MIT and in China say they’ve made a major advance in this area, with a new version of a key component for lithium batteries, the cathode.

The team describes their concept as a “hybrid” cathode, because it combines aspects of two different approaches that have been used before, one to increase the energy output per pound (gravimetric energy density), the other for the energy per liter (volumetric energy density). The synergistic combination, they say, produces a version that provides the benefits of both, and more.

The work is described today in the journal Nature Energy, in a paper by Ju Li, an MIT professor of nuclear science and engineering and of materials science and engineering; Weijiang Xue, an MIT postdoc; and 13 others.

Today’s lithium-ion batteries tend to use cathodes (one of the two electrodes in a battery) made of a transition metal oxide, but batteries with cathodes made of sulfur are considered a promising alternative to reduce weight. Today, the designers of lithium-sulfur batteries face a tradeoff.

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