Rechargeable Lifepo4 Battery High Capacity Lithium Battery 3.2V 100ah Li-Ion Battery For Solar Storage

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Rechargeable Lifepo4 Battery High Capacity Lithium Battery 3.2V 100ah Li-Ion Battery For Solar Storage

Rechargeable Lifepo4 Battery High Capacity Lithium Battery 3.2V 100ah Li-Ion Battery For Solar Storage

Rechargeable Lifepo4 Battery High Capacity Lithium Battery 3.2V 100ah Li-Ion Battery For Solar Storage

Apply to solar street light/Electric golf cart/Solar storage
Color Blue(customizable)
Weight 5100g
Nominal voltage 3.2v
Chemistry IFR/LiFePo4
Capacity 240Ah
Max discharge current 400A
Contiuous discharge current 240A
Max charge voltage 3.6V±0.5V
Voltage at end of discharge 2.5V
Max charge current 1C-240A
Rechargeable Yes
Positive Flat
Charge temperature 0-45°C
Discharge temperature -20-60°C

Research on CCS technology has generated a good understanding of the carbon-capture process that takes place inside a CCS system. When CO2 is added to an amine solution, molecules of the two species spontaneously combine to form an “adduct,” a new chemical species in which the original molecules remain largely intact. In this case, the adduct forms when a carbon atom in a CO2 molecule chemically bonds with a nitrogen atom in an amine molecule. As they combine, the CO2 molecule is reconfigured: It changes from its original, highly stable, linear form to a “bent” shape with a negative charge — a highly reactive form that’s ready for further reaction.

In her scheme, Gallant proposed using electrochemistry to break apart the CO2-amine adduct — right at the carbon-nitrogen bond. Cleaving the adduct at that bond would separate the two pieces: the amine in its original, unreacted state, ready to capture more CO2, and the bent, chemically reactive form of CO2, which might then react with the electrons and positively charged lithium ions that flow during battery discharge. The outcome of that reaction could be the formation of lithium carbonate (Li2CO3), which would deposit on the carbon electrode.

At the same time, the reactions on the carbon electrode should promote the flow of electrons during battery discharge — even without a metal catalyst. “The discharge of the battery would occur spontaneously,” Gallant says. “And we’d break the adduct in a way that allows us to renew our CO2 absorber while taking CO2 to a stable, solid form.”

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