Rechargeable Lithium Batteries 48V 40AH Lithium Polymer Battery Pack For Li Ion Manufactures

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Rechargeable Lithium Batteries 48V 40AH Lithium Polymer Battery Pack For Li Ion Manufactures

Rechargeable Lithium Batteries 48V 40AH Lithium Polymer Battery Pack For Li Ion Manufactures

Rechargeable Lithium Batteries 48V 40AH Lithium Polymer Battery Pack For Li Ion Manufactures

Model

48V40Ah

Cell

3.7V

Size :

customized

Nominal Voltage

48V

Nominal Capacity

40Ah

Internal Resistance

≤420mΩ

End of charge Voltage

54.6V

End of charge Current

200mA

End of discharge Voltage

45V

Charge Method

0.2C (0.5A) CC/CV

Max.Continuouscharge currnt

5A

Nominal Discharge Current

40A

Max. Pluse Discharge Current

80A/10S

Weight

≤11.5Kg

Operating Temp.

Charge

0~45℃

Discharge

-10~55℃

Storage Temp.(60-80% SOC Storage)

-10~45℃

[email protected] rate 0.2C

≥ 40Ah

Cycle Life 500 times(Cycle @RT,

1C rate,100%D\OD)

Researchers at Cornell University have created a system of circulating liquid — “robot blood” — within robotic structures, to store energy and power robotic applications for sophisticated, long-duration tasks.

The researchers have created a synthetic vascular system capable of pumping an energy-dense hydraulic liquid that stores energy, transmits force, operates appendages and provides structure, all in an integrated design.

“In nature we see how long organisms can operate while doing sophisticated tasks. Robots can’t perform similar feats for very long,” said Rob Shepherd, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Cornell. “Our bio-inspired approach can dramatically increase the system’s energy density while allowing soft robots to remain mobile for far longer.”

Shepherd, director of the Organic Robotics Lab, is senior author of “Electrolytic Vascular Systems for Energy Dense Robots,” which published June 19 in Nature. Doctoral student Cameron Aubin is lead author.

The researchers tested the concept by creating an aquatic soft robot inspired by a lionfish, designed by co-author James Pikul, a former postdoctoral researcher, now an assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania. Lionfish use undulating fanlike fins to glide through coral-reef environments.

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