Lithium Ion Battery 12v 18650 Rechargeable Batteries 5200mah With High Quality

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Lithium Ion Battery 12v 18650 Rechargeable Batteries 5200mah With High Quality

Lithium Ion Battery 12v 18650 Rechargeable Batteries 5200mah With High Quality

Lithium Ion Battery 12v 18650 Rechargeable Batteries 5200mah With High Quality

1 Battery cell model 18650
2 Combination 3S2P+PCM
3 Nominal voltage 11.1V
4 Nominal capacity 5200mAh
5 Standard discharge current 0.2C
6 Max discharge current 1C
7 Standard charge current 0.2C
8 Fast charge current 0.5C
9 Inner resistance 160mohm
10 Over discharge cut off voltage/series 2.4 ± 0.06V
11 Over charge protection voltage/series 4.25± 0.03V
12 Discharge working temperature -20-60°C
13 Charge working temperature 0-45°C
14 Recommended storage temperature 23 ± 5°C
15 Flow value 5A
16 Weight about 270g
17 Size customized

The obvious drawback of solar panels is that they require sunlight to generate electricity. Some have observed that for a device on Earth facing space, which has a frigid temperature, the chilling outflow of energy from the device can be harvested using the same kind of optoelectronic physics we have used to harness solar energy. New work, in a recent issue of Applied Physics Letters, from AIP Publishing, looks to provide a potential path to generating electricity like solar cells but that can power electronics at night.

An international team of scientists has demonstrated for the first time that it is possible to generate a measurable amount of electricity in a diode directly from the coldness of the universe. The infrared semiconductor device faces the sky and uses the temperature difference between Earth and space to produce the electricity.

“The vastness of the universe is a thermodynamic resource,” said Shanhui Fan, an author on the paper. “In terms of optoelectronic physics, there is really this very beautiful symmetry between harvesting incoming radiation and harvesting outgoing radiation.”

In contrast to leveraging incoming energy as a normal solar cell would, the negative illumination effect allows electrical energy to be harvested as heat leaves a surface. Today’s technology, though, does not capture energy over these negative temperature differences as efficiently.

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